The Ticket is the story of a frantic search for a missing lottery ticket worth $241 million. The lives of a corrupt gambler, a retired detective, and a woman in hiding intersect as the ticket is about to expire. 

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Publishers Weekly Review of The Ticket

                                                        Honors for The Ticket


Grand Prize Finalist and Honorable Mention (commercial fiction) Eric Hoffer Award (2018)

Shortlisted Finalist for the Mystery & Mayhem Award from Chanticleer Book Reviews (2017) 

Finalist for the  National Indie Excellence Awards  (2017)

Finalist for the Clue Awards from Chanticleer Book Reviews (2014)

Quarterfinalist in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award Contest (2013) 

In this gripping, clever novel, reminiscent of Scott Smith’s bestseller, A Simple Plan, the author takes what begins as a reasonable path to riches and shows the many ways a sure thing quickly can devolve into uncontrolled chaos. Attorney Channing Booker lives and works in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he spends most of his free time betting on various sporting events and cheating on his wife, Susan. Channing has lost most of his money on bad bets, until one day he buys a lottery ticket at Wally’s Quick Mart and finds he’s just won $241 million. You’d think he’d be overjoyed, but Channing is such a sleazebag that he’s annoyed that he’s going to have to split it with his wife, who he is planning to divorce. He decides to entrust the ticket to one of his drinking buddies, Sully Pendleton, and have him cash it in and then secretly turn the money over to Channing after his divorce is finalized. After all, what could go wrong with that plan? Obviously, everything. But the author’s genius is in eschewing the obvious plot arc and supplying readers with all the many other things that could possibly go wrong, most of them completely unexpected. Threaded within the plot twists are other stories of secondary characters, some hapless, some heroic, that in the end knit together to create a terrific, satisfying read.


Publishers Weekly, an independent organization, reviewed The Ticket in manuscript form prior to publication.

Fred Shackelford        Author